The Secret To Peeling Boiled Farm Fresh Eggs


For those of you who don't enjoy farm fresh eggs on a regular basis, you're likely wondering what's to peeling a boiled egg?  But, for those of you who have struggled with boiling farm fresh eggs only to want to toss the entire batch when you're attempting to remove the shell and half the egg comes with it, this post is for you.

I hadn't really given much thought to egg peeling as a dilemma when boiling fresh eggs.  Until the first time I tried it.  At first I thought it was me.  Somehow, I'd suddenly started boiling and peeling eggs wrong.  But soon enough I realized it was the eggs.  They were too fresh.  {is that possible???}


Choosing eggs that are at least 10 days old will likely resolve the issue, however, I find a very simple tip to have worked every time I've boiled eggs, one day old or 20 days old.

The tip?

Keep the eggs cold, in the refrigerator, until the water is boiling.  Then, with a spoon, drop the slowly into the boiling water.  I've also read many people have success with adding 1/2 teaspoon baking soda to the water, but I've never had reason to try it since I have success with adding cold eggs to boiling water.

It is believed that the reason a very fresh egg does not peel as well as an older egg is because the ph of the fresher egg white is low, causing it to adhere to the membrane lining the shell more firmly.  As the egg ages, the ph increasing, allowing for more air between the white and the membrane.

Here is my simple, always perfect, boiled egg "recipe".
 
Hard-Boiling Eggs
 
Add cold water to a medium-size saucepan.  You'll want the water to cover the eggs by an inch, so if you need to measure, put the eggs in the pan, add the water, then remove the eggs and put them back in the refrigerator.
 
Bring the water to a boil over high heat.
 
Remove the eggs from the refrigerator, and with a spoon, carefully lower the eggs into the pan of boiling water.
 
Turn off the heat, cover the pan, and let sit for 15 minutes.
 
Remove the lid, drain off water, and fill pan with cold water to stop the eggs from cooking.  Drain cool water and peel.
 
The next time you crave egg salad sandwiches, you'll be all set to boil perfect, easy-to-peel, eggs!


9 comments:

Lauren Ann said...

I've never tried that, always been told it would crack the shells. I've tried the baking soda but to be honest, never thought it made that much of a difference. Will try this next time I make eggs! Thank you! :D

daisy g said...

I can really use this! Since we've been buying our eggs directly from the farmer, we've had a more difficult time with it. Pinned again!

That egg salad sandwich looks yummy! I'll have to see if you have any secret ingredients in the recipe.

Our Neck of the Woods said...

Interesting! I don't boil eggs very often, but I will keep this in mind. It's kind of strange but I actually eat fewer eggs now than I did before I had chickens! haha.

Your eggs are so pretty! I love that photo.

Kim said...

I've struggled with this for far too long. Thanks for the tip!

Buttons said...

Oh thank you for the tip I never can get those fresh eggs to peel I will try this trick. Your sandwich photo is making me very hungry what a great shot you should be a food photographer yours work just the way they are supposed too:) Enticing.. B

Brenda said...

The eggs are so pretty. Lovely advice, now I just need to learn to crack an egg properly!

Mary said...

Good to know. I don't often boil eggs, but I do use fresh free-range Amish market eggs. Recently, I was forced to buy grocery store eggs (needed them ASAP), and I could really taste and see the difference.
The grocery store eggs had such pale yolks in comparison. Now you've given me a craving for egg salad.

Staci at Life At Cobble Hill Farm said...

So happy this will come in handy!! :)

Tammy Sudac said...

Steam the farm fresh eggs instead of BOILING them all together! Put them in the steamer basket, put on the lid, turn on the burner, 20-22 minutes later, perfect, easy to peel "boiled eggs"!